Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for August, 2009

Snow Flakes

Snow crystals form when tiny supercooled cloud droplets freeze. These droplets are able to remain liquid at temperatures lower than −18 °C (0r °F), because to freeze, a few molecules in the droplet need to get together by chance to form an arrangement similar to that in an ice lattice; then the droplet freezes around this “nucleus.”

Read Full Post »

Ice Flowers

Ice flowers are formed on new layers of sea ice, from saturated water vapors that come up from under the ice through cracks. In contact with the cold air, the vapors start to freeze and the salt on the surface of the ice begins to crystallize and serves as a nucleus for the frozen vaporized water. Thus, molecule by molecule the ice flowers begin to take shape. They have recently been recognized as the dominant source of sea salt aerosol in Antarctica and scientists suspect they may be the main cause of tropospheric ozone depletion during the polar sunrise. One of the most beautiful frozen wonders on Earth, ice flowers are still a mystery to many people.

Read Full Post »

Ice Circles

A rare phenomenon usually only seen in extremely cold countries, scientists generally accept that Ice Circles are formed when surface ice gathers in the center of a body of water rather than the edges. A slow moving river current can create a slow turning eddy, which rotates, forming an ice disc. Very slowly the edges are ground down until a gap is formed between the eddy and the surrounding ice. These ice circles have been seen with diameters of over 500 feet and can also at times be found in clusters and groups at different sizes. (Photo by Brook Tyler) (Link)

Read Full Post »

Ice Caves

Ice caves are a type of natural cave that contain significant amounts of ice. At least a portion of the cave must have a temperature below 0 °C (32 °F) all year round, and water must have traveled into the cave’s cold zone. There are many ice caves throughout the world, but the Eisriesenwelt Ice Caves in Austria are some of the largest known to man. (Link)

Read Full Post »

Frozen Waterfalls

The growth of a frozen waterfall can proceed only gradually, for progressive freezing of the flowing water. There are thousands of frozen falls around the world. The one located at Beijing’s Myun County attracts tourists from all over the country as well as internationally. A beautiful display of nature’s art at work.

Read Full Post »

Allergic to modern living

For most people talking on a mobile phone, cooking dinner in the microwave or driving in a car is simply part of modern living in 21st century. But completing any such tasks is impossible for people like Debbie Bird – who is allergic to modern technology. The 39-year-old is so sensitive to the electromagnetic field (emf) or ‘smog’ created by computers, mobile phones, microwave ovens and even some cars, that she develops a painful skin rash and her eyelids swell to three times their size if she goes near them.

Officially in the UK, electro-sensitivity (ES) does not exist as a medical condition. Doctors say there is little scientific evidence to back up a link between EMF and poor health. They claim the symptoms, often attributed to flu or viruses, are psychosomatic. But campaigners disagree. They reckon around 500 people are already being treated for ES and as many as five per cent of the population could be affected. (Link)

Read Full Post »

Allergic to the sun

It’s not that uncomun for people to be allergic to the sun, but there is special type of sun allergy, called solar urticaria, that is very rare. It is said that very few people in the world suffer from it. Solar urticaria (SU) is a rare condition in which exposure to ultraviolet or UV radiation, or sometimes even visible light, induces a case of urticaria or hives that can appear in both covered and uncovered areas of the skin. The most common locations include the “V” of the neck, the back of the hands, the outside surface of the arms and the lower legs. (Link)

Read Full Post »

Allergic to Wood

Allergic to wood

Wood allergies can definitely be troublesome. While people are allergic to certain types of wood or sawdust, there are cases when people are allergic to any type of wood in many types of forms, whether it is dust or solid. Along with wood allergies comes the fact that you can’t touch paper, use a pencil, or be a lumberjack! The allergy can be so strong that it can cause the skin to look as if it was burned. In most cases wood allergies cause skin irritation, coughing, sneezing, and hives.

Dan Hill, a 32 year-old banker, quit his £80,000 a year job to live his dream of being a carpenter, only to discover he had developed an allergy to wood. Luckyly for him, he found a wood he was not allergic to – Welsh oak – and moved from the workshop in Devon to Swansea to start a furniture business with his brother. (Link)

Read Full Post »

Allergic to Sex

Medical researchers have found that some women are allergic to their male partner’s seminal fluid, the thick liquid that carries sperm. Doctors know the disorder as “human seminal plasma hypersensitivity.” In rare cases, the allergic response can cause death. But there is good news. The malady is usually treated by allergists, although it takes some effort by concerned, caring male partners. To desensitize a woman’s immune system against semen, doctors can either apply diluted samples of semen to a woman’s vagina every 20 minutes, gradually increasing the concentration over the course of several hours, or the women can receive allergy shots containing small amounts of semen over the course of several weeks. Both techniques require sex two or three times a week to train their immune system. (Link)

Read Full Post »

Allergic to Water

Known as aquagenic urticaria, this condition is said to only affect one out of every 23 million people in the world. Being allergic to water is extremely rare, and most that are allergic to it are confined to their homes. The person is hypersensitive to the ions found in non-distilled water, so most have to be very careful when drinking water, or they drink distilled water.

Teenager Ashleigh Morris can’t go swimming, soak in a hot bath or enjoy a shower after a stressful day’s work – she’s allergic to water. Even sweating brings the 19-year-old out in a painful rash. When Ashleigh gets wet her body explodes in sore, itchy red lumps that take about two hours to ease. She has to wash. But showering is a painful experience and she can only do it for a minute at a time. These brief showers are the only contact Ashleigh has with water. (Link)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »